Interesting Facts, History & Information About African Burial Ground

Interesting Facts, History & Information About African Burial Ground

Discover the fascinating history and significance of the African Burial Ground, a historic site in New York City where thousands of enslaved and free Africans were buried during the colonial period.

Learn about the archaeological excavations that uncovered this important piece of history, the stories of the people buried there, and the ongoing efforts to preserve and commemorate their legacy.

Interesting facts about African Burial Ground

The African Burial Ground is a historic site located in Lower Manhattan, New York City. Here are some interesting facts about the site:

  1. The African Burial Ground was discovered in 1991 during construction work for a federal building. The site was estimated to contain the remains of approximately 15,000 African people, many of whom were enslaved.
  2. The burial ground was in use from the late 17th century to the late 18th century. During this time, it served as the primary burial site for enslaved and free Africans in New York City.
  3. The site covers an area of approximately 6.6 acres and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1993.
  4. The African Burial Ground is the largest and earliest known excavated burial ground of free and enslaved Africans in North America.
  5. The remains found at the African Burial Ground have provided significant insights into the lives of enslaved and free Africans in colonial America. For example, dental analysis has shown that many of the individuals buried at the site suffered from poor nutrition and dental health.
  6. The African Burial Ground was the subject of a long and contentious political and legal battle. In 1993, the remains of the individuals buried at the site were reinterred in a solemn ceremony attended by thousands of people.
  7. The African Burial Ground National Monument was established in 2006 to commemorate the site and its significance to African American history.
  8. The African Burial Ground is a symbol of the resilience and strength of the African diaspora in the face of oppression and marginalization.

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Information & History of African Burial Ground

The African Burial Ground is a historic site located in Lower Manhattan, New York City, that served as a burial ground for enslaved and free Africans during the late 17th to the late 18th centuries. Here’s a brief history of the site:

History:
The history of the African Burial Ground dates back to the 17th century when enslaved Africans were brought to the colony of New York. These Africans, many of whom were from West and Central Africa, were forced to work on plantations, construction sites, and as domestic servants.

By the late 17th century, the need for a burial ground for the growing population of enslaved and free Africans in New York City became necessary. In 1697, the colonial government of New York designated a parcel of land outside the city walls, near what is now Foley Square, for use as a burial ground for Africans.

Over the years, thousands of enslaved and free Africans were buried at the site. The burial ground was in use until the late 18th century when it was closed due to overcrowding.

Rediscovery:
The African Burial Ground was rediscovered in 1991 during construction work for a federal building. Archaeologists excavated the site and discovered the remains of approximately 15,000 Africans, making it the largest and earliest known excavated burial ground of free and enslaved Africans in North America.

The discovery of the African Burial Ground sparked a national conversation about the history of African Americans in the United States and the need to acknowledge and preserve their contributions and sacrifices.

Controversy and Reinterment:
The discovery of the African Burial Ground also sparked a long and contentious political and legal battle. Despite efforts by local activists and community groups to preserve the site and honor the remains of those buried there, there were attempts to build a commercial development on the site.

After years of protests and legal battles, the remains of the individuals buried at the African Burial Ground were reinterred in 2003 in a solemn ceremony attended by thousands of people. The reinterment was preceded by a year-long community consultation process that sought to honor the legacy of those buried at the site.

Today, the African Burial Ground is a National Monument that serves as a symbol of the resilience and strength of the African diaspora in the face of oppression and marginalization. The site is a reminder of the important contributions of African Americans to the history and culture of the United States.

FAQ:

Here are some frequently asked questions (FAQ) about the African Burial Ground:

Q: What is the African Burial Ground?

A: The African Burial Ground is a historic site located in Lower Manhattan, New York City, that served as a burial ground for enslaved and free Africans during the late 17th to the late 18th centuries.

Q: How was the African Burial Ground rediscovered?

A: The African Burial Ground was rediscovered in 1991 during construction work for a federal building. Archaeologists excavated the site and discovered the remains of approximately 15,000 Africans.

Q: Why is the African Burial Ground important?

A: The African Burial Ground is important because it provides significant insights into the lives of enslaved and free Africans in colonial America. The site is also a symbol of the resilience and strength of the African diaspora in the face of oppression and marginalization.

Q: What happened to the remains found at the African Burial Ground?

A: The remains of the individuals buried at the African Burial Ground were reinterred in 2003 in a solemn ceremony attended by thousands of people. The reinterment was preceded by a year-long community consultation process that sought to honor the legacy of those buried at the site.

Q: What is the African Burial Ground National Monument?

A: The African Burial Ground National Monument was established in 2006 to commemorate the site and its significance to African American history.

Q: What have researchers learned from studying the remains found at the African Burial Ground?

A: The remains found at the African Burial Ground have provided significant insights into the lives of enslaved and free Africans in colonial America. For example, dental analysis has shown that many of the individuals buried at the site suffered from poor nutrition and dental health.

Q: Can visitors visit the African Burial Ground National Monument?

A: Yes, the African Burial Ground National Monument is open to visitors. Visitors can view exhibits and learn about the history and significance of the site.

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About me

Hello,My name is Aparna Patel,I’m a Travel Blogger and Photographer who travel the world full-time with my hubby.I like to share my travel experience.

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